Accelerated Fragility: Exploring The Supply-Demand Nexus at Health Facilites in Rural Burkina Faso.

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Accelerated Fragility : Exploring The Supply-Demand Nexus at Health Facilites in Rural Burkina Faso. / Samuelsen, Helle.

In: Africa, Vol. 90, No. 5, 2020, p. 934-51.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Samuelsen, H 2020, 'Accelerated Fragility: Exploring The Supply-Demand Nexus at Health Facilites in Rural Burkina Faso.', Africa, vol. 90, no. 5, pp. 934-51. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0001972020000662

APA

Samuelsen, H. (2020). Accelerated Fragility: Exploring The Supply-Demand Nexus at Health Facilites in Rural Burkina Faso. Africa, 90(5), 934-51. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0001972020000662

Vancouver

Samuelsen H. Accelerated Fragility: Exploring The Supply-Demand Nexus at Health Facilites in Rural Burkina Faso. Africa. 2020;90(5):934-51. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0001972020000662

Author

Samuelsen, Helle. / Accelerated Fragility : Exploring The Supply-Demand Nexus at Health Facilites in Rural Burkina Faso. In: Africa. 2020 ; Vol. 90, No. 5. pp. 934-51.

Bibtex

@article{b1cb9874b0df4c7dae964fe6145861d4,
title = "Accelerated Fragility: Exploring The Supply-Demand Nexus at Health Facilites in Rural Burkina Faso.",
abstract = "In Burkina Faso, political turmoil, escalating insecurity and a looming pandemic challenge the population's trust in the state. This article contributes to the debates about state–citizen relationships in fragile countries by connecting local health-seeking practices with the global trends of datafication and a strong focus on the fight against malaria in this part of Africa. Drawing on long-term research engagement in Burkina Faso, I examine the health-seeking practices of rural citizens and look into diagnostic routines and reporting in two rural dispensaries. I show how the routinization of diagnostic procedures combined with a strong national and global political focus on the fight against malaria create what I term a ‘supply–demand nexus’ in which rural citizens selectively ask for the health services that they know the system can supply. I argue that the routinized diagnostic practices that mainly focus on malaria serve as a ‘technology of invisibility’ by not capturing other important diseases among the rural population. Finally, I ask whether the limited healthcare services in the current context of political insecurity, instability and a global pandemic spur a process of further fragilization of the social contract between rural citizens and the state.",
author = "Helle Samuelsen",
year = "2020",
doi = "10.1017/S0001972020000662",
language = "English",
volume = "90",
pages = "934--51",
journal = "Africa",
issn = "0001-9720",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Accelerated Fragility

T2 - Exploring The Supply-Demand Nexus at Health Facilites in Rural Burkina Faso.

AU - Samuelsen, Helle

PY - 2020

Y1 - 2020

N2 - In Burkina Faso, political turmoil, escalating insecurity and a looming pandemic challenge the population's trust in the state. This article contributes to the debates about state–citizen relationships in fragile countries by connecting local health-seeking practices with the global trends of datafication and a strong focus on the fight against malaria in this part of Africa. Drawing on long-term research engagement in Burkina Faso, I examine the health-seeking practices of rural citizens and look into diagnostic routines and reporting in two rural dispensaries. I show how the routinization of diagnostic procedures combined with a strong national and global political focus on the fight against malaria create what I term a ‘supply–demand nexus’ in which rural citizens selectively ask for the health services that they know the system can supply. I argue that the routinized diagnostic practices that mainly focus on malaria serve as a ‘technology of invisibility’ by not capturing other important diseases among the rural population. Finally, I ask whether the limited healthcare services in the current context of political insecurity, instability and a global pandemic spur a process of further fragilization of the social contract between rural citizens and the state.

AB - In Burkina Faso, political turmoil, escalating insecurity and a looming pandemic challenge the population's trust in the state. This article contributes to the debates about state–citizen relationships in fragile countries by connecting local health-seeking practices with the global trends of datafication and a strong focus on the fight against malaria in this part of Africa. Drawing on long-term research engagement in Burkina Faso, I examine the health-seeking practices of rural citizens and look into diagnostic routines and reporting in two rural dispensaries. I show how the routinization of diagnostic procedures combined with a strong national and global political focus on the fight against malaria create what I term a ‘supply–demand nexus’ in which rural citizens selectively ask for the health services that they know the system can supply. I argue that the routinized diagnostic practices that mainly focus on malaria serve as a ‘technology of invisibility’ by not capturing other important diseases among the rural population. Finally, I ask whether the limited healthcare services in the current context of political insecurity, instability and a global pandemic spur a process of further fragilization of the social contract between rural citizens and the state.

U2 - 10.1017/S0001972020000662

DO - 10.1017/S0001972020000662

M3 - Journal article

VL - 90

SP - 934

EP - 951

JO - Africa

JF - Africa

SN - 0001-9720

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 233674254