Tine Gammeltoft

Tine Gammeltoft

Professor

Member of:

Teaching

Global health; sexual and reproductive health; chronic health conditions; gender, kinship, sexuality; globalization and development; social studies of science; ethnographic methods; project design; critical theory; feminist theory; medical anthropology; the anthropology of Asia.

Primary fields of research

The research I conduct is driven by a general interest in the social and structural forces that shape human health and wellbeing. In my ethnographic research I focus particularly on the ways in which domestic conditions affect people’s health and health care seeking practices. My research is collaborative and interdisciplinary, and I am particularly interested in the development of theories and methodologies that can help us to attend to tentative, inchoate, and subdued dimensions of social existence. In this context, I draw inspiration from philosophy, psychoanalytic theory, and art. In my book Haunting Images: A Cultural Account of Selective Reproduction in Vietnam (winner of the Senior Book Prize, 2014 and the Eileen Basker Memorial Prize, 2015), I examine how new technologies for reproductive selection are used by the state as well as by individuals in Vietnam, highlighting how advancing biomedical technologies engage with long-standing patterns of attachment, dependency, and power. My research in Vietnam is based on long-standing relations of collaboration and includes research training and capacity-building.

At the Department of Anthropology I currently serve as Deputy Head of Department for Research and as PhD Programme Coordinator.

Current research

I am responsible for the interdisciplinary research/intervention project Living Together with Chronic Disease: Informal Support for Diabetes Management in Vietnam (2018-2023). The project aims to advance research on non-communicable diseases (NCDs) by providing new insights on domestic and informal forms of care. The project is conducted in Vietnam’s Thai Binh province as an academic partnership between Thai Binh University of Medicine and Pharmacy and the Universities of Copenhagen and Southern Denmark. It is carried out in close collaboration with the Danish-Vietnamese Strategic Sector Cooperation (SSC) project: Strengthening the Frontline Grassroots Health Worker: Prevention and Management of NCDs at the Primary Health Care Level, with Novo Nordisk as private sector partner. We have recently received a grant for a Phase II of the project which will focus on gestational diabetes among pregnant women in Thai Binh. The project is funded by the Danish Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

I am a member of the Editorial Boards of Ethos (the journal of the Society for Psychological Anthroplogy) and Reproductive Health Matters.

Selected publications

  1. E-pub ahead of print

    Everyday attentiveness: understanding diabetes in Vietnam through literary displacement

    Gammeltoft, Tine, 28 Mar 2022, (E-pub ahead of print) In: Journal of the Royal Anthropological Institute. 18 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  2. Published

    The Varieties of Transformative Experience: Ethnographic Explorations

    Bregnbaek, S. & Gammeltoft, Tine, 13 Jan 2022, In: Ethos. 49, 3, p. 239-248 10 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  3. Published

    Spectral kinship: Understanding how Vietnamese women endure domestic distress

    Gammeltoft, Tine, Feb 2021, In: American Ethnologist. 48, 1, p. 22-36 15 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  4. Published

    The Force of Love: Type II Diabetes in Vietnam as Tentatively Transformative Experience

    Gammeltoft, Tine, Sep 2021, In: Ethos. 49, 3, p. 329-347 19 p.

    Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

  5. Published

    Haunting Images: A Cultural Account of Selective Reproduction in Vietnam

    Gammeltoft, Tine, Feb 2014, Berkeley: University of California Press. 336 p.

    Research output: Book/ReportBookResearchpeer-review

ID: 9837